Storm Barra UK weather forecast – Met Office warning as 70mph wind, torrential rain and heavy snow pose 'threat to life'

NEARLY ALL of the UK is under yellow weather warnings for snow and wind today.

The Met Office has placed the WHOLE of England and Wales, and three quarters of Scotland, under a severe yellow weather warning for snow and wind.

A chilling map shows the extent of the affected area, with everyone from County Durham to Kent expected to feel the winter chill.

Heavy snow is expected across northern England and Scotland bringing likely travel disruption, especially over higher routes

Read our UK weather live blog for the latest news and updates….

  • Joseph Gamp

    Misery for hundreds in north-east without power

    Meanwhile, misery continues for hundreds of households in the North East of England after Arwen left them without electricity.

    They are in one of the areas covered by the latest Met Office yellow warnings.

    Northern Powergrid said it is in "the final push" to reconnect 500 customers who remained without power on Tuesday morning.

  • Joseph Gamp

    10 days without power

    Stewart Sexton, 57, said his power at his home near Alnwick has finally been restored after 10 days.

    Mr Sexton said he and his partner, Jane, were forced to live without power from November 26 after a telegraph pole in their village snapped. He said they used candles for light and used a wood-burning stove to heat up pans of water to wash and make hot drinks.

    He said: “Our electricity was connected at around 6pm last night (Monday). We were 10 days without heating and I have no idea how we coped. It was worse for a lot of people but was still a nightmare.

    “It has been absolutely exhausting. Even today, I still haven’t warmed through yet. It feels like you’ve been camping or to a 10-day music festival. How elderly people and people with young children coped is beyond me.”

    Mr Sexton said the light at the end of the tunnel – and in the house – came at around 6pm on Monday after engineers had spent up to six hours working to fix the telegraph pole.

    He said: “It’s such a relief.”

  • Joseph Gamp

    Barra won't be as impactful as Arwen

    Met Office spokeswoman Nicky Maxey said: "We are not expecting the impacts of Barra to be as bad as we saw with Arwen.

    "Storm Barra will bring strong winds and heavy rainfall to many parts of the UK today.

    "We may see some snow on the higher ground, too.

    "It is unlikely to be as impactful as Storm Arwen last week but there will be blustery conditions so people should still be prepared."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Ireland flooded as one person injured

    The impacts have included a flooding of 23 premises in Bantry in Co Cork, some other properties in Galway city and in Cork city.

    There has been one report of a person being injured in the south-west of the country, although it is not yet clear if this is related to the storm.

    Emergency financial supports are to be put in place for businesses damaged by Storm Barra, which will not be impacted upon by the supports in place for those hit by Covid-19 restrictions.

    Schools, colleges and creches in some of the worst-affected areas were shut amid warnings that no part of the island will escape the effects of the storm.

    The Minister for Education, Norma Foley, is to make an announcement later on Tuesday on whether schools will close for a second day on Wednesday.

    Minister O’Brien said people in red and orange level areas should not travel for vaccinations.

    “We’re saying these people particularly in red areas to stay at home, not to leave home, and for people not to take unnecessary trips in other areas,” he said.

  • Joseph Gamp

    Stay safe amongst Storm Barra this evening

    More turbulent weather conditions will continue this evening.

    The majority of the UK is under a yellow weather warning for snow, rain and wind.

    A tweet from the Met Office read: "Stay Weather Aware this evening as #StormBarra continues to bring a mixture of heavy rain, snow and also strong winds."

  • Joseph Gamp

    Storm Barra will not be as brutal as Arwen, forecasters say

    The first early effects of Storm Barra have been felt across the UK and Ireland, with gusty winds battering communities already enduring what Boris Johnson described as unacceptable power outages.

    The Met Office said it is likely that Barra will not be as bad as Arwen, its predecessor, but that disruption to the travel network is likely, with snow and heavy rain in some areas until Wednesday.

    Elsewhere, some short-term loss of power is possible due to the wind.

    There is also "a small chance" that larger-than-usual waves in coastal areas could present a risk of injury or potentially a threat to life if wild winds whip street furniture and beach material into the air.

    Gusts of 70mph have already been recorded at Berry Head in south Devon, and on Sherkin Island, south-west of Co Cork in Ireland.

    There were further gusts of 69mph at Aberdaron, on the western tip of the Llyn Peninsula in Wales.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Is Storm Corrie next to wreak havoc?

    Storm Corrie could be named as more gales hit at the weekend and again early next week, said The Weather Company, the world's biggest commercial forecaster.

    Leon Brown, head of meteorological operations at The Weather Company’s Weather Channel arm, said: “After Tuesday, another storm is likely to be named in the next week as very strong Atlantic jet stream winds create more deep low pressure areas.”

    The Met Office will name Storm Corrie when another Atlantic weather system has potential for amber warnings for wind, with rain or snow impacts also considered.

    A Met Office forecaster said: “It will often be windy and rather cold into Saturday. More strong winds will follow across the country, with hill snow likely in the North. Further ahead, the chance of gales persists.”

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Double weather bomb on the horizon

    Barra's 'double weather bomb'

    1,000-mile wide Barra's 'double weather bomb' storm is shown in a dramatic satellite image.

    Scotland's wildest week for two years is seeing Storm Barra's gales, eight inches' snow and floods – and Storm Corrie threatens in days.

    7,000 UK breakdowns are expected tomorrow as the buffeting from 1,000-mile wide Barra's 'double weather bomb' continues.

    Toppled trees were set to block roads, with Network Rail poised to impose train speed restrictions and planes buffeted as they came in to land.

    The RAC said: “Drivers should slow down and keep their wits about them.”

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Drivers to be aware of Barra debris on the road

    Storm Barra is bringing high winds and drivers should be alert to debris on the roads.

    Sean Sidley, AA patrol of the year, says: “Storm Barra has been battering the UK with strong winds today and it’s very likely trees and debris will be littering the roads. Drivers should be very cautious especially in rural or woody areas. If you see twigs or small branches on the road it could be a sign that a tree has fallen just around the bend, so pay extra attention to the path up ahead.

    “As always in windy weather, leave plenty of space behind other vehicles and adjust your speed to suit the conditions, especially when crossing bridges or passing high-sided vehicles."

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Barra only 'halfway through,' says Irish minister

    Storm Barra is only "halfway through" and the strongest winds could be yet to come, the Housing Minister has warned.

    Some 56,000 homes are without power and may not be reconnected for a number of days, Government officials have said, after the country was battered by winds of up to 130km per hour.

    The Defence Forces are to be drafted in for "extensive recovery operations", to clear debris and damage caused by the storm.

    Minister Darragh O'Brien said: "We are only halfway through. The winds may increase, and are projected to do so later in the day and into the evening."

  • Adriana Elgueta

    30,000 homes in Ireland now without power

    Storm Barra has made landfall, with winds predicted to reach 80mph as it crosses east throughout the day.

    Heavy rain and sleet was expected on Tuesday as Barra continued its path from the Atlantic. Snow was already falling in the north-west of the country.

    The national weather service, Met Éireann, said the storm, which was likely to reach the UK within hours, could pose a danger to life over the next two days.

    The UK was also braced for 80mph winds and heavy showers when Barra makes landfall, less than two weeks after Storm Arwen caused significant damage to parts of the country.

    Power cuts were reported in Cork, Kerry, Dublin and Limerick and people in three counties on the west coast advised to remain indoors.

    Flooding in Cork and Kerry rendered several roads unpassable because of water or fallen trees.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Storm Barra predicted not as bad as Arwen

    The first early effects of Storm Barra have been felt across the UK and Ireland, with gusty winds battering communities already enduring days-long power outages.

    The Met Office said it is likely that Barra will not be as bad as Arwen, its predecessor, but that disruption to the travel network is likely, with snow and heavy rain in some areas until Wednesday.

    Elsewhere, some short-term loss of power is possible due to the wind.

    There is also "a small chance" that larger-than-usual waves in coastal areas could present a risk of injury or potentially a threat to life if wild winds whip street furniture and beach material into the air.

    Gusts of 70mph have already been recorded at Berry Head in south Devon, and on Sherkin Island, south-west of Co Cork in Ireland.

    There were further gusts of 69mph at Aberdaron, on the western tip of the Llyn Peninsula in Wales.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Inquiry launched into power less during Arwen

    A former UK energy minister has been tasked with leading an inquiry into how one of the major power companies performed during Storm Arwen, the impacts of which stretched from the end of November to the first week of December.

    SP Energy Networks say 200,000 of its customers lost power as a result of the 90mph winds which swept the south of Scotland on November 26.

    The former minister Charles Hendry said: “The scale of the damage caused by Storm Arwen is some of the worst the UK’s power networks have experienced in over 25 years.

    “While it is incredibly rare for homes to be without power for the lengths of time we have seen in the past week, we need to take stock and understand what could be done differently to prepare or respond to an event like this to minimise its effect in future.”

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Gale-force winds blow trampoline into garden

    A trampoline blows into a garden as 50mph gale force winds take hold in Clon Elagh, Derry, Northern Ireland today.

    An overturned trampoline at a house in Clon Elagh, DerryCredit: PA
  • Adriana Elgueta

    Yellow weather warnings for whole of UK

    Almost all of the UK is covered by yellow weather warnings for snow, ice, and wind, with a five-day deep freeze on the way.

    The Met Office upgraded its warnings to add an alert to drivers about icy roads from Monday evening at 9pm to Tuesday at 9am.

    Forecaster Marco Petagna said: “It looks a nasty weather system, with low pressure deepening rapidly. It's going to be very windy.”

    Exact Weather’s James Madden said: “Tuesday will see an extensive and rapidly deepening area of low pressure working its way northwards across the country initially bringing heavy rain and strong winds.

    “This will turn to snow as the storm system meets colder conditions across the UK.

    “With the storm coinciding with snow, we could see a ‘snow bomb’ effect where heavy snow erupts suddenly with stormy conditions.”

    Currently, there are 36 flood alerts in place as heavy rain is also expected to hit the country.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Snow falls with strong winds today in Scotland

    Temperatures hovers just above zero in Glasgow and Edinburgh, down to -3C in central and highland areas. North coastal areas seeing up to 6C today.

    A fallen tree blocks the A702 near Coulter in South LanarkshireCredit: PA
    Members of the public make their way through the snow in the village of Leadhills this morningCredit: Getty
  • Adriana Elgueta

    Storm Barra makes its presence known

    Early this morning on the South West coast huge waves crashed into the shore in Devon and Cornwall.

    Massive waves crash into the seafront in Dawlish, DevonCredit: SWNS
    Waves were crashing into the coast at Lyme RegisCredit: BNPS
    Huge Waves break over Penzance sea front early this morning as Storm Barra approaches the UKCredit: Alamy
  • Adriana Elgueta

    Why are storms named?

    While the names of storms can be light-hearted, the impacts from storms can be severe.

    Names were selected on a range of criteria, including whether it is being used by other storm naming groups, whether there have been significant impacts from previous storms with the same name and if it is a name that has already been used in recent years by the group. 

    Storms will be named by the group when they’re deemed to cause ‘medium’ or ‘high’ impacts in the UK, Ireland or the Netherlands. In addition to strong winds, impacts from rain and snow will also be considered in the naming process.  

    The naming of storms is intended to help the media and public better communicate the impacts of potential severe weather events, helping people to stay safe and protect themselves and their property ahead of inclement weather.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Name meanings behind the storms

    Other names included on the list are Kim, with reasons behind its nomination including a ‘whirlwind’ relative and a self-confessed weather watcher.  

    Logan, a name of Scottish origin, was nominated by several parents and grandparents, including a mention of a grandson who "runs through the house like a tornado" and one who is "as quick as lightning" when playing as a goalkeeper. 

    A cat who "comes in and acts like a storm", has also found her name on the list, with Storm Ruby making the final cut. This is a name that was also nominated for a daughter who "leaves a trail of destruction" when she comes in the house.  

    Dudley fought off competition from seven other names beginning with D to top a poll which ran on Twitter last week which had over 12,000 votes.

    One reason Dudley was originally submitted was for a couple who are due to get married in 2022 and will then share the last name of Dudley. They wrote, “We find it comical to name a storm for us getting married.” 

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Do I still have to use my annual leave when I'm on holiday and my workplace closes?

    This depends upon your employers individual policy and whether employees are still expected to work when the business is shut.

    In some cases, you could possibly claim your holiday back if all other staff members have been granted a day off due to the weather.

    However, if employees are still expected to work from home or continue their roles outside of the workplace, then it is unlikely you will be able to claim your annual leave back.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    My child’s school is closed – can I take the day off work?

    Parents are entitled to take a reasonable amount of emergency unpaid time off work to look after your children is there is an unexpected disruption in their normal care arrangements.

    This could include the closure of a nursery or school due to adverse weather conditions.

    However, this time should be used to make alternative arrangements for their care instead rather than caring for your child.

    Many employers are more flexible though in these circumstances and will allow employees to take holiday at short notice or, if appropriate, to work from home or make the time up.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Does my employer have to pay me if my workplace is closed because of the weather?

    If your work is closed due to extreme weather conditions such as heavy snow, you will still be paid for the time it is closed.

    If you are ready, available and willing to work but bosses have closed, you should be awarded your usual rate.

    The day can not be marked down as a holiday – unless there is an advance warning of bad weather and employers give prior notice for people to use it.

    It is important to check your contract because it may contain clauses regarding specific arrangements for snow days, as some employers can ask you to work from home if you are able to.

    If you are on a zero-hours contract or your employer has a contractual right to decline to offer you work at short notice, they may not have to pay you.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Is there a minimum workplace temperature that should be met?

    Despite complaining amongst colleagues that it is too cold to do your job, there is no minimum workplace temperature requirement.

    Although employers are required to provide a safe working environment, the Health and Safety Executive provides guidance and recommends a minimum temperature of 16C for offices – but this is not law.

    They also recommend a temperature of 13C for those carrying out indoor work with physical effort.

    Acas says employees should be allowed to wear warmer clothing and take hot drink breaks when the temperatures nosedive.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    Does my employer have to pay me if I can't get to work in the Storm Barra snow?

    Sometimes snow makes the journey to work dangerous or downright impossible, leaving some people unable to commute.

    So, will you get paid if you can't make it in work? Unfortunately, there is no automatic legal right to be paid if you miss work due to bad weather.

    Employers are entitled to regard your absence as unauthorised, even if it is due to weather circumstances way out of your control.

    Travelling to work is your responsibility – but exceptions may be made if the company provide transport such as a bus service which is cancelled.

    Some employers may allow staff to use annual leave to cover the snow day or even work from home.

    However, it is important to remember your employer should not force or pressure you to unnecessarily attempt the journey if there are legitimate safety reasons why you should not travel.

  • Adriana Elgueta

    All the storm names this season:

    A few names in the mix that may leave us wondering how to say them such as Tineke or Méabh!

    Arwen 

    Barra 

    Corrie 

    Dudley 

    Eunice 

    Franklin 

    Gladys 

    Herman 

    Imani 

    Jack 

    Kim 

    Logan 

    Méabh 

    Nasim 

    Olwen 

    Pól 

    Ruby 

    Sean 

    Tineke 

    Vergil 

    Willemien 

    Source: Read Full Article