An NYC broker sold over $1 billion of luxury real estate in the past 5 years. She has 3 simple hacks for staying organized while juggling multimillion-dollar clients and working 12-hour days.

  • Lisa Lippman has worked in the real estate industry for over 20 years and has sold over $1 billion worth of real estate over the past five years.
  • She represents multimillion-dollar clients across Manhattan.
  • Lippman told Business Insider she has three crucial tricks that help her stay organized on the job.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

In the age of work from home, top agents around the country are getting creative with how they do business.

One of them is Manhattan real-estate broker Lisa K. Lippman, who has sold over $1 billion of real estate over the past five years.

Lippman is a broker at the luxury real-estate firm Brown Harris Stevens, where she was the No. 1 broker in 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019. The Wall Street Journal named her the No. 4 broker in Manhattan in 2016, and most recently she was ranked 21 among the nation's small teams by volume and number three within both New York state and New York City.

She told Business Insider that she typically worked a 16-hour day pre-pandemic, and when the real-estate industry was shut down during quarantine that shifted to about six hours each day, which she utilized to stay in touch with buyers and sellers, maintaining and managing current deals. "Since we went back three weeks ago," Lippman said. "I have had 12-hour days." 

Representing multimillion-dollar clients across Manhattan, Lippman revealed the three crucial tricks that help her stay organized.

Here are her tips:

1. Flag unread emails

Lippman told Business Insider that she stays on top of her emails by checking them every hour. She believes every email should be answered in a three-hour window. She also suggests flagging important emails that you can't answer right away so that they don't get lost in your inbox.

"Part of becoming a good multitasker is looking at emails and if you don't have a lot of time, figuring out which ones have to be responded to right away and which ones can wait two to three hours," said Lippman.

In April 2019, Business Insider's Lisa Eadicicco broke down eight tips to make managing your inbox easier. When it comes to answering in a timely manner, she suggests scheduling emails ahead of time. The option to schedule emails has become available to Gmail users; it can be accessed by hitting the arrow next to the "Send" button. According to Eadicicco, there is also a feature that makes it possible to delay the delivery of emails in Outlook for Office 365, Outlook 2019, Outlook 2016, Outlook 2013, and Outlook 2010.

2. Avoid social media (as much as you can)

While Lippman has both personal and business social media accounts, she told Business Insider she never checked them during the day pre-pandemic. And now … she said she tries her best to avoid it.

People who use social media get distracted from their work, she said, although she acknowledge that it's become more commonplace while working from home.

the view never gets old 🌃 showing our amazing duplex with views from every room at 15 West 63rd street today! . . . #nevergetsold #viewsforever #ourcity #friday #fridayfunday #workday #bestlocation #dreamhome #dreamapartment #luxuryhomes #luxuryapartment #luxuryrealestate #luxuryliving #nycliving #nycre #nycrealestate #topbroker #brokerlife #nycbroker #milliondollarlisting #brownharrisstevens #brownharrisstevensnewyork #parkview #centralpark #cityview #manhattanhome #westside #upperwestside

A post shared byLisa Lippman (@lisalippmanrealestate) on Jan 10, 2020 at 11:32am PST

 

"Definitely more social media while working from home, but I try to avoid it. Being on social media while you're working ends up being a huge time-waster," Lippman said. "It makes your brain wander from the task at hand."

3. When setting up phone calls, never say "call me"

Lippman said she sets aside time to speak with her clients because it makes them feel important. But she has a specific way of going about it: Anytime someone asks for a call, she gets their availability and sets up an appointment on her calendar.

"Rather than just telling someone to call you, you should set up a time to speak. In my business, we are in and out of appointments all the time, we're not sitting at a desk," Lippman said. "I find that if I don't [set up a time], I'm playing phone tag with somebody and that's not enjoyable, it doesn't make them feel important."

Lippman's time-management advice echoes that of many business leaders and experts. Business Insider's Shana Lebowitz reported that leadership and business consultant Greg McKeown says that when you're estimating how long it will take to complete something, multiply it by three — most of the things on your to-do list will take longer to finish than originally expected.

Other practices such as creating a calendar system, making lists, and taking short breaks throughout the day are all things work experts say will make work days more productive.

Source: Read Full Article